The_timber_story

The logs were all cut, of course with a cross cut saw and barked by hand with an axe ... and whoever worked there would be working in mud all the time ... everything was done out in the open no matter how wet it was.

John Lloyd Gould, 1985

Sections of the bush where logs were felled were referred to as coupes, from the French word meaning to cut.


Elwin

Elwin (Tiny) Hoffman felling a tree in Marysville Forest, n.d.

Courtesy EJ and RG Anderson Family Collection




THE LOCATIONS OF SOME OF MARYSVILLES TIMBER MILLS

old_map

1. Knots 1916

2. Marchbank 1916

3. Divers 1940

4. Burt & Timms 1917

5. Nobel-Anderson 1920s

6. Herman 1920s

7. Don Lovett 1940

8. Little Wonder 1930s

9. Little Wonder 1938

10. Feiglin 1934

11. Cambarville 1937

12. Feiglin 1934

13. Feiglin 1955

14. AE Anderson No. 1 1929

15. AE Anderson No. 2 1942

16. Ratcliffe 1943

17. WM Cook 1944

18. A & J Sund (Sund Bros.) 1950-89

19. Drains 1930s

20. Stebbins 1947

21. Vic Oak 1931

22. Jack Elliott 1925

23. Howells 1935

24. Ron Bassett 1947

25. Tony Miller 1947

26. Cameron & Barton 1941

27. Flatmans 1940

28. Victor Yelland 1940

29. Ernie Peake 1942

30. Robinson Bros. 1945

31. Paget 1938

32. Bromfield & Gorman 1934

33. Menz 1938

34. Jack Arnold 1950

35. Lee Archer 1928

36. Drains 1927, later JL Gould

Sawmills Pty Ltd 1958-95

37. WM Cook 1946


Nestled in the Great Dividing Range, the Marysville Forest is home to the largest concentration of Mountain Ash (Eucalyptus regnans) in Victoria. It was in this forest that early timber workers made their living.

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